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Well this post is a bit overdue but better late than never I say!  A few weekends ago Patrick and I participated in the Multiple Sclerosis Society’s “City to Shore” ride.  We started in Cherry Hill, NJ (about 8 miles from Philly) and ended up in Ocean City, NJ (about 75 miles from Philly).  We did some fundraising to help the Society find a cure for MS but mostly went on the ride to say we did it and have fun!

City to Shore finishers!

The ride is a two-day event and we had originally planned to camp beach-side upon our arrival in Ocean City.  After a week of rainy-weather forecasts we booked a hotel room at the last-minute.  This meant less gear to schlep with us so when the alarm went off at 4:00am on Saturday morning the bikes were already packed and ready to go.  We set off through empty city streets toward the light rail that would take us to the start line.  We had a quick pit-stop at the 24-hour convenience store to pick up coffee drinks (have YOU ever tried to bike at 4:00am without caffeine??)  We shared the train car with several other cyclists and more got on at each stop.

We're going to do what now?

The starting line was conveniently located at the Cherry Hill train station’s massive parking lot.  Bright street lights pierced the pre-dawn darkness, thousands of cyclists milled about waiting for the start and the line for the porta-potties seemed to stretch on forever.  We had arrived early enough to join the first wave of “century cyclists”– people like us who wanted to add an extra 25 mile loop to their day to bring that day’s mileage up to 100 miles.  Unfortunately the aforementioned line prevented us from setting off early so we ended up waiting at the head of a mess of about 6,500 cyclists for the “official start”.  As we waited in the fairly quiet queue we heard someone’s over-inflated tire burst with an impressive “PSSSSSSSSSSST”, bummer!

Sunrise at the starting line

Waiting to roll

Finally we were on the road at the official start time of 6:40am.  The route wound through sleepy Cherry Hill neighborhoods and into the countryside.  We slipped past fields still blanketed in mist, a cloudy sky preventing the sun from peeking out to burn off the morning dew.  The miles seemed to fly by quickly and I gleefully called out each mile marker.  We soon pulled into the first rest stop for a potty break and some breakfast.

The Whiz Palace

Feeling energized from some bananas and Cliff bars we almost decided to skip the next rest stop to keep our rhythm up.  But as we breezed past the rest stop entrance I heard a volunteer shouting “THIS IS THE LUNCH STOP!”  I’m not one to pass up free lunch so we quickly pulled over to scope it out.  There were huge tents set up with boxes and boxes of prepared sandwiches, ants-on-a-log and fruit.  Another tent had freshly grilled chicken sandwiches and all the fixin’s.  Normally I would have gone crazy on all this good stuff but it will still only 9:30am and a chicken sandwich did not sound appealing.  So I grabbed some stuff to eat later while Pat the “Iron Stomach” Kelley inhaled two chicken sandwiches.  We both grabbed a few extra Cliff bars, a habit that would continue throughout the ride.

9:30am "lunch"

The next dozen miles rolled past easily on the mostly flat course.  We flew past NJ’s famous blueberry fields, some of which are surrounded by gigantic Jurassic Park-style fences.  I made pterodactyl noises for a few miles to entertain us.  Soon we found ourselves at the turn-off for the Century Loop.  The loop was scheduled to close at 11:00 but we were there with plenty of time to spare and we eagerly turned off to join the “hardcore” cyclists.  As we chugged along I noticed that there were very few ladies on the Century Loop.  C’mon girls!

Feel the burn! 45.5 miles to go!

There was a really nice rest stop on the Century Loop.  Kids enthusiastically filled our water bottles and handed out energy bars.  There was a feeling of camaraderie but also pending exhaustion among the cyclists.  I ate my lunch and felt instantly better.  We picked up some “Century Cyclist” patches and hit the road again.  After 15 more miles we were dropped back onto the regular route.  At first I thought I was having deja vu but then realized we had joined the regular route a few miles BEFORE the Century Loop turn off.

We're feeling OK!

People clog the entrance chute of the next rest stop where we turn off to get more water.  I noticed that the “elite” riders were also the most discourteous riders all day.  One team in particular, The Flamers, seemed to think they were especially entitled to not follow the race rules.  It was disappointing but luckily most cyclists just wanted to have a nice time like us!  After a very quick stop we hit the road again, determined to get into Ocean City around 3:00pm.

The miles seemed to somehow become longer and I started to get that feeling like I was riding through Jell-O.  As we rounded a curve I felt my front tire slip and thought that I must really be getting exhausted.  I convinced Pat to stop at the final rest stop so I could re-group.  As we pulled in I realized my “exhaustion” was caused by a flat front tire!  Fortunately the ride provided free mechanical service at all the stops.  20 minutes and one new tube later we were ready to hit the final stretch!  Words cannot express how happy I was to discover that flat at the rest stop and not on the side of the road.  From mile 1 we had seen cyclists with their wheels up, fixing a flat or waiting for help.  Most of them were little skinny road bike tires that had been over-inflated.  Gotta love those weekend cyclists!

FLAT!

A nice mechanic fixing bikes

As the last 9 miles slowly disappeared behind us we started seeing more and more supporters on the roadsides.  A group of kids waved homemade signs and cheered for us, a little girl sat on her bike at the end of her driveway yelling “GO! GO! GO!” and a boy scout troop handed out free lemonade at their own impromptu rest stop.  My weary legs felt a burst of energy from all these kind people showing us that they knew we could make it.

Ocean City neared and I started hearing grumbling in the ranks about “the bridges.”  As in: “save your energy for THE BRIDGES” or “last year I couldn’t make it over THE BRIDGES”.  I would be lying if I didn’t say I was a little concerned.  But I put it out of my mind, no way I was taking a SAG wagon ride at this point!  I could smell the salt water in the air and my bum longed for a stretch so on we pushed.  The line of riders jammed up at a series of stop lights and we found ourselves in a holding pattern for about 20 minutes.  Pat played the defence with his pannier- keeping stupid cyclists from whizzing past the stopped line of bikes (to go where, exactly???).  Soon enough I could see the dastardly bridges in the distance.

I was scared.  They looked like the first hill on a reallybig roller coaster and, to my tired legs, they seemed about 10 miles long and 50 miles steep.  But I was also thrilled to see them.  I had 98 miles behind me and nearly 7 hours in the saddle.  Would I let a couple of small (GIGANTIC) hills keep me from obtaining my goal??  No way.  So up, up, up we chugged and down, down, down we breezed.  I wish I could say the view was worth it but honestly most of my brain was focused on keeping my legs pumping.  We avoided possible calamity as those dang Flamers squeezed past us and the traffic to our left, without even the smallest whisper of “on your left.”  Pat reminded them not the be fools ;)  We cleared the second bridge as well and soon rolled into Ocean City.

With one mile left I started to get delirious from exhaustion and happiness.  The streets were lined with people waving signs and cheering.  A man in a wheelchair shouted “thanks for riding for ME!” and I nearly lost it.  The finish line chute was bordered with gates and people who don’t even know us screamed “congratulations!” and “you did it!” while clanging cow bells.  The finish line announcer was pretty anti-climatic in his announcing as we rolled under the banner, “You are at the finish.”

Finish line and supporters

I feel proud! (and tired)

I hear someone shouting my name from the sidelines and soon pick out one of my volunteers from work!  He’s there to support a friend but congratulates us on finishing too.  He also breaks the news that Ocean City is in a dry county so we won’t be having that celebratory beer I’d been looking forward to for about 45 miles…  Instead we hit up the free food tents, grab our finishing medals and t-shirts and then walk the boardwalk.

Best dang hot dog ever!

Walking "the boards"

God's smile :)

It’s a beautiful afternoon and we treat ourselves to some gelato and cheesy fries.  As we walk to our hotel we see a beautiful rainbow form over the ocean.  My heart bursts with pride at our accomplishment and the beauty of the day we just shared.  We retire to our hotel to stretch, take long, hot showers and to regroup.  We decide that the day was just perfect and that a 75-mile ride back the next day would be too much.  We sign up for the free bus that leaves in the morning and slip into a deep and well-deserved sleep.

YUMMMMMM!

Congratulations to US!

This thing is legit!

A beautiful end to the day

Collection of "extras" from the rest stops, lol

Big wheel at sunset

The next morning we load our bikes into a moving van with hundreds of other cyclists who will join us on a school bus ride back to Cherry Hill.  The drive takes about 1.5 hours, a hilariously short time compared to the 7.1 hours it took the day prior.  Soon we’re pulling into the train station parking lot, our bikes are unloaded and we board the return train.  A police officer at the Philadelphia stop congratulates us, noticing our matching City to Shore t-shirts.  Breakfast is at Famous 4th Deli where we both tuck into massive omelets and bottomless coffee.  It’s the perfect end to a challenging and rewarding weekend.

Truck full of bikes

We rode 100 miles at an average speed of 15.2 MPH.  From start-to-finish the ride took 8 hours, 7.1 of which were in the saddle.  We ate at least 8 Cliff bars each and drank about 1.5 gallons of water each.  One flat tire, 2 finisher medals and tons of fond memories.  Thank you to all of our sponsors and supporters!

The Kelley's in Ocean City

This summer my museum’s special exhibit is Mummies of the World, a fairly new traveller from American Exhibitions Inc.  When I first heard that we were getting this exhibit I was stoked, I mean really excited.  Since I’ve worked at TFI we’ve hosted two blockbusters about ancient Egypt (Tut and Cleopatra) and although these were fantastic exhibits with beautifully presented artifacts, they were seriously lacking in the wrapped-up dead people.  And I mean, c’mon, isn’t that the thing we living humans are REALLY interested in?  Okay, maybe just me and all the 10-year old boys out there…  Anyway, Mummies of the World boasts 70 human and animal mummies all sharing a well-designed 10,000 square foot gallery space.

Our Public Relations department did a great event for the press during the load-in process.  They got some uber-serious security guys to escort the exhibit cases and personally load in the mummies.  I am a little embarrassed to admit that all I could think of the whole time was what a great practical joke it would be to hide someone in one of the cases (wrapped in bandages, of course) and then have them pop out right after the Philly Tourism Board spokeswoman exclaimed, “Philly’s More Fun When You Sleep Over!” with a sign reading “FOREVER.”  But I guess that’s what working in a haunted house for 3 years will do to a person…

The "short guy" was probably 6'3"...

And I thought I had a weird job.

"With Love" campaign banner, cute!

When the education team met earlier this year to plan out what programs we wanted to offer, one of the ideas we kept coming back around to was how cool it would be to let people touch mummies.  Since the exhibit curators wouldn’t look too kindly on us prying open cases for guests we decided to take a slightly different route: frogs.  So in February we ordered an army of frogs (dissection specimen, we didn’t catch them…) and set to mummifying them in a variety of ways.

Buddy and his many mummified frogs

The specimen were dried, baked, salted, pickled and frozen and all turned out surprisingly well.  During the press event we were able to meet with Dr. Heather Gill-Frerking, the lead scientist/mummiologist (a special word made up by the exhibit) on Mummies of the World.  I was a little nervous at first, worrying she might take our demonstration the wrong way and think we were making fun of her work.  Fortunately she was thrilled.  Her own PhD dissertation examined mummies and she created a similar experiment with fetal pigs in the bogs of north Germany.  An anchorwoman from a local news station was really interested and did a fun spot with Dr. Gill-Frerking and the frogs.  More pictures from the event here.

The anchorwoman loved it ;)

We’ve had the “Mummification Station”, as the demonstration is now called, on the museum floor for a few weeks now and it seems to be a really big hit with our guests.  After the press event we ordered a kitchen vacuum-sealer and encased the frogs in freezer bags.  This way guests can still get a good idea of how the various mummification techniques look and feel.  The one specimen that I have some reservations about is the frozen frog, or “Flash” as he is affectionately known around the office.  Even though he spends the day packed in an insulated cooler surrounded by ice packs he still ends up a bit mushy by closing time.  This might be one of those instances where our imaginations are better than the real thing…

Meet Flash

The exhibit itself is really interesting and I definitely recommend it.  There are mummies from all around the globe– South America, Europe, Oceania, Asia and of course Egypt.  The exhibit focuses mostly on what scientific techniques and technologies are used to learn more about mummies.  It also talks about the history of mummification though you will have to look and listen closely to get the religious and cultural lessons in some galleries.  The art historian in me was a little let down BUT the exhibit is meant for a science museum venue so I really can’t complain.  I left the exhibit with a greater understanding of how other cultures handle their dead and some new science knowledge.  Oh and the gift store has some pretty hilarious merchandize like onsies that make your baby look like a mummy and “I <3 my Mummy” t-shirts, I must resist it’s fun wares daily ;)

 

*Because they keep things under wraps!!!  Hahaha, of corpse that’s the answer!

It’s officially summertime!  I love longer days, healthy foods, and of course many more bike rides.  But summer cycling can be brutal in the city.  Disgusting heat and smog.   Burning pavement.  And drivers whose minds are at the beach, not on the road.  Fortunately a little preparedness goes a long way– helmet, brakes, lights and water bottle.  And for the times we want to get out of this heat island and hit up the trails running west we bring:

Anti-"rain-on-my-parade" kit

No need to be worried about being stranded with a flat when you have a well-stocked repair kit like this!  I put this together after an unforunate turn of events last spring.  It has everything needed to repair/replace a tube on the go.  Here’s what’s inside: spare tubes, tire irons, tube patch kit (in case it’s not TOO serious), a CO2 pump and CO2 cartridges.  And it all fits neatly into this Clinique “free bonus” tote- tres chic!  When we go on longer rides we also pack our bike multi-tool for any unexpected adjustments.

Thumbs up for preparedness!

I love summer for other reasons though.  Summer always feels like a time of change, probably due to years spent in school when summer is the chance you get to reinvent yourself before the next school year.  Pat’s recent promotion has brought lots of newness to us: a new work schedule for him, new people to meet and get to know, new responsibilities and new resources at our disposal.  My favorite part is having evenings and some weekend days off together again.  Pat has been a grill-master lately, whipping up classics like fiery BBQ chicken and veggie kebab but also tantalizing my taste buds with new creations like a grilled steak and mushroom sandwich (as in the whole sandwich is grilled to heavenly perfection).  Even a little rain won’t stop him!

Rainy day grilling under the cover of the upstairs balcony

New opportunities also mean a chance to re-evaluate our plans and thoughts about the future.  When we first started planning an “around the world” trip nearly 3.5 years ago our lives were A LOT different.  I was fresh out of grad school, Pat was still a little baby barista at Starbucks, we weren’t even engaged and saving tens of thousands of dollars for years to go on a 6-12 month vacation sounded like the best idea we’d ever had.  So I obsessively researched places we could go, put pins on a google map and saved, saved, saved our money.  Now I have a job in my field and am growing as an educator, Pat is on his way to managing his own store, our second wedding anniversary is around the corner and, well, the tens of thousands of dollars is still being worked on.  I will admit that the idea of “getting away from it all” for months, schlepping ourselves and our belongings across Europe to see new and exciting things and setting our lives on an entirely new trajectory still has appeal.  I still spend a lot of time daydreaming about all the many places, people and things we will see one day.  Travel and the allure of the exotic got under my skin after my college experience abroad (or maybe it was all the books set in far-away lands I read as an impressionable youngster).  But other obsessions are emerging, too: children, a house of our own, becoming a school teacher  and helping Pat achieve his goals.

Life is what happens when you’re busy making other plans. -John Lennon

How do you decide which of life’s roads to travel down?  We have so many options, opportunities and blessings it’s overwhelming at times.  But one of the biggest gifts I have been given is a partner who understands that it’s really not these future paths that define who we are.  Our life together is in the here and now, the little everyday moments and seemingly mundane.  My dreams, Pat’s dreams, and the dreams we share are fluid and flexible and can be what we make them.  “Giving up” the trip of a lifetime isn’t really giving up anything– it’s adding the potential for many mini-trips, saving money for travel AND family and opening doors to ideas we never considered.  The specifics of the dream may change, but that’s the beauty of the unknown, isn’t it?

Existence would be intolerable if we were never to dream. -Anatole France

So I look forward to continuing to dream big dreams, planning for our future as best we can and drinking in the sweet bliss of our everyday life together.  Here’s to this summer, to a wonderful husband and to being here now!

Things are not what they appear to be; nor are they otherwise.

Elation, exhaustion and eating.  Those three words pretty much summarize our first official “bicycle tour” for me.  We set out for the Little Red Barn Campground in Quakertown, PA last Friday morning, spent the night and rode back to Philly on Saturday.  So all things considered not much of a tour, but a great practice run for longer trips and overall a good experience.

We loaded our bikes on Thursday night and ate a carb-full dinner in anticipation of the 50+ miles we’d ride each day.  On Friday morning I woke up to cramps and general malaise but I was determined to go.  So after egg sandwiches, coffee and stretching we hit the road.  It was so nice to feel the warm sun and take in the lush green Schuylkill banks, especially after a week of rain.   The Manayunk tow path was looking like a jungle with crazy vines and tunnels of green leaves.  We stopped for a snack at the “wayside bike stop” at the beginning of the Schuylkill path and saw a doe about 20 feet up the path– I was surprised to see one so close to the path and houses!  No picture since digging for it would have scared her :(

Pat's bike loaded up

Our journey continued until we pulled over just after Valley Forge (about 25 miles) to mow down hoagies and cookies for lunch.  Once back in the saddle we both commented on how awesome you feel after eating… a full tank of gas!  After a few more miles we turned onto the Perkiomen Trail, a first for us.  It’s a very pretty, hard-pack gravel path that winds west through towns and forests.  We spotted cardinals, a bluejay and some super-cute chipmunks.

“Navigation” for this trip was printed google directions– I now admit this was not my best plan ever.  At some point in the directions you are instructed to leave the path and start heading north to Quakertown on country roads.  Somehow we got waaaaay off track.  Luckily Pat’s phone has a decent maps application and we were able to redirect ourselves.  Unluckily we took a wrong turn and ended up many more miles out of the way.

Throughout all of this navigational bumbling we were also tackling some of the biggest hills I’ve encountered.  Philly is pretty flat and the 3 hills I climb each day commuting are just a few blocks long so this was uncharted territory.  These hills felt endless to my screaming legs and I had to get off and walk a few times.  Pat gently reminded me that Europe has WAY more, and bigger, hills so this is good practice.  We had to pull over for a banana break after he said that since I was irrationally yelling “screw Europe! I HATE bicycle touring!” in response.  I felt so defeated by the hills, being off-track and my tired body that I even suggested heading home.  But 15 more miles of hills sounded more manageable than 40 miles back.  No quitting!

I will survive!

Twelve miles and many turns later I ecstatically blew kisses at a road sign that said 3 miles to our campground.  As we churned up one last hill I found a hidden pocket of energy after spying campers and tents in the woods to our right– we had made it!  I checked us in, picked up some hotdogs from the camp store and we got settled into our “home” for the night.  Our tent is a breeze to pitch and we were set up and devouring left-over pizza in about 15 minutes.  We relaxed in the tent, soaking in the beautiful woods around us and breathing in the fresh air.

Trees from inside the tent

REI Quarter Dome T3 tent, love it!

Later we walked the campground’s loops to stretch our legs and check out all the ridiculously large RVs clustered together. I gave Pat a run for his money at the air hockey table in the campground’s game room (they also had a pool but we didn’t have suits, boo)  Dinner was hotdogs roasted on the campfire then stuffed in pita pockets with cheese and mustard.  Trust me, anything is delicious after 6 hours of bike riding so this was gourmet.

Forest surrounding the camp site

Breakfast and map reading

The next morning I woke feeling a little sore but ready to take on the day’s riding.  Knowing that the hills were at the beginning of the ride and that we wouldn’t get lost this time made getting back on my bike a lot easier.  A quick breakfast of PBJ in a pita, trail mix and cookies and we were back on the road.  Our route back to the Perkiomen Trail was more direct (understatement of the year) and carried us through the many small communities and back roads of Upper Bucks county.  Just outside of Collegeville we stopped to gawk as several skydivers landed in a grassy airfield.  Feeling venturesome, we agreed that if we can bicycle tour we can certainly skydive!  SO now that’s on our bucket list…

Although I had pre-made some falafel patties to have with hummus, pita and veggies for lunch we decided to treat ourselves to a diner sitting just a few yards off the trail.  The best part of the meal for me was letting my booty rest on the squishy booth, sweet, sweet relief!  We rode side-by-side for the next 20 miles or so, cracking up at our lame jokes and encouraging each other on.  One more snack break in Norristown and all of a sudden we were in the city again.  The ride home from the trail is a complete blur to me, my mind was focused only on a cold shower and our couch.  The one and only safety incident we had on the trip happened 4 blocks from home when a police officer nearly doored Pat while getting out to talk to a bike cop.  But we made it home in one piece and the rest of the night was spent chillin’ and reducing a large pizza to crumbs.

Here are some things we learned:

1. GPS is an absolute MUST.  We were rewarded for this mistake though because REI had a brief mega-sale on them the day we got home and I picked up a Garmin GPSMAP 62s for 30% off- score!

2. Eat a lot.  I think we learned this last year when we went on our first long haul, but it’s good to keep in mind.  I can get really cranky when my blood sugar dips!  I’m planning on taking a small, soft-side cooler next time we do an overnight.  Also bring more water.  We stopped at CVS on the way there and back for big Gatorades.

3. Our plan for Europe is totally do-able.  Not that I really doubted that… but thinking/writing about it is one thing, actually doing it is another.  So this showed me that we will face some challenges in our trip but that they will be more than worth it.

Lastly, sorry for the lack of pictures– we were pretty focused on biking.  I want our next trip to be a 3-day weekend so we won’t feel so rushed for time.  At the end of the trip we had logged 121 miles and over 10 hours in the saddle!  Not too shabby for two Long Haul Truckers’ first really long haul :)

Life is good!

Rolling through PA

I-80 cuts clear across Pennsylvania, 311 miles of pavement connecting the gently rolling Pocono mountains to the flat prairies of Nebraska and eventually on to the Sierra Nevada range in California.  Pat and I drove nearly all of the PA portion a few weekends ago to join my family for my Nana’s memorial service.  Spring was definitely creeping through the many valleys we passed though.  Some were vibrantly green while others still held on to winter gray.

Spring arriving

As we headed north out of Philadelphia we spotted huge storm clouds ahead. The radio station we were tuned into issued tornado warnings for the county we had just left.  Luckily the storm seemed to pass over without too much adverse effect.

A powerful storm

Driving toward clearer skies

By the time we got hungry for lunch the skies were nearly blue again.  We took a little detour to the Bald Eagle State Park.  It was really nice– lots of benches, a little lake with beach and clean bathrooms.  Sadly no bald eagles were sighted :(

Tall trees

We had a picnic, snapped a few pictures and then got back on the road.

Us by the lake

The forest smelled really good

It even had a babbling brook!

With many more miles to put behind us Pat set the cruise, I kept the jelly beans flowing and amused myself by taking out-the-car-window pictures.  I can’t wait until we’re touring on our bikes so I can get closer to the beautiful world around me.

Pretty farms

One bright green tree

Fatty cloud

I hung my head out the car window to take this tunnel shot… camera strap on, of course!

zooming down the tunnel

Rocky PA

I concocted this tasty, margarita-like drink in honor of Cinco de Mayo, my second most favorite “holiday celebrated with many drinks”.  But I think it’s perfect for any spring occasion– I plan on sipping one in my backyard while I gaze on the pretty flowers and enjoy the sweet songbirds tweeting. Ole!

In a hurricane glass (or for the non-fancy-glass equipped like myself, a pint glass works just as well) MIX well with ice:

1 oz tequila

1 oz triple sec

1 oz (about 3 tbsp) frozen pineapple juice concentrate– you could try other fruits too, this one just sounded yummy to me
Top with limeade (I like Santa Cruz brand) and garnish with a lime wedge.  Sip through a bendy straw for added fun :)

It's scary good

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One of my favorite things about Philadelphia is the smooth path lining the Schuylkill river– it’s accessible, gives you a break from the city streets and is well-maintained.  One of my least favorite things about Philadelphia is when people get lost in la-la land while using this path, completely unaware of anything outside their two square feet of pavement.  Undoubtedly (and in deference to my last post) this results in me having to ride cautiously, rather than rip through as the blur of cycling awesomeness I prefer.  Luckily it’s now May and for the next several months the Fairmount Park Commission gives Philadelphians like me the most fabulous treat– the car-free, pedestrian/cyclist/rollerblader heaven that is West River Drive on the weekend!

Take that, cars!

I had planned to ride out to Valley Forge today, I really need to get some more long hauls in…  But when I realized the Drive was closed I just stuck close to home.  I did four laps of the car-free section which I think ended up being around 25 miles.  It was so delightful riding in the sunshine, feeling the breeze at my back, and honking back at the many nesting geese.  These guys know the sound of a trail mix bag…

Don't take food from strangers, silly goose.

Fairmount Park is so gorgeous in the spring.  I definitely did one-lap-on, one-off for this ride so I had plenty of time to admire the scenery.  The newly green trees and pretty little flowers popping up make me grin like the adorable labradoodle loping along next to its owner (I hope my tongue wasn’t hanging out that much though).   All four lanes of West River Drive are closed to traffic, leaving plenty of room for families to ride together, rollerbladers to throw their arms around wildly and for joggers to run right down the middle of the road just because you can.  I love it all. 

Panoramic park

 

Stab that dragon!I think he forgot his suit of armor... and undies (hee!)

Chillaxin

This week I’m definitely back to my 100 mile challenge.  The weather looks like it’s really spring so I have no excuses!

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